Evan A. Variano

STUDENTS INTERESTED IN GRADUATE STUDY PLEASE SEE INSTRUCTIONS AT END OF THIS PAGE!

STUDENTS INTERESTED IN UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PLEASE FILL OUT FORM: http://goo.gl/forms/pEB34gbF5j

My research approaches from several directions the dynamics of transport and mixing in environmental flows.  This research is centered in the Engineering Laboratory for Fluid Motion in the Environment (ELFME), 110 O’Brien Hall.  

Our collective progress in understanding the fundamental dynamics of fluid flow enables new engineering applications.  To this effect, I am interested in:

  • Designing water management regimes for restored wetlands that control the emission of greenhouse gasses.
  • Explaining the interaction between turbulence, water sampling, and water quality. 
  • The life of organisms is shaped by the flow in their habitat.  I am interested in measuring the “turbulent climate” of certain habitats and determining the effects this has on communities.

Engineering methods allow new ways to explore those aspects of fluid flow that are still poorly understood.  Techniques I am developing include:

  • Quantitative imaging in flows through dense vegetation or sediment
  • Robust measurement of turbulent dissipation
  • Measuring the flux of gasses and aerosols at interfaces

PROSPECTIVE GRADUATE STUDENTS

Thank you for your interest in this research!  I am always looking for people who want to get involved -  people are the heart of research!

The absolute best way to get involved with my research is to apply to the UC Berkeley graduate program in Civil and Environmental Engineering. You will likely have some questions about this process, which are best answered by our Graduate Admissions Advisor, Shelley Okimoto.  In addition, there is a rotating group of faculty that serve as Admissions Directors and can help you through the process.  If you want to speak to me directly, I'll have the most fun if we talk about engineering, not admissions details! ;-)  

To arrange for such a meeting, please send me an email with the information discussed below.  As formal as it sounds, if you use the item numbers in your email, it will let me know that you actually read this, and are not just spamming every professor!

  1. When do you plan on applying to our graduate program?
  2. What part of the research portfolio gets you excited?
  3. Please attach an unofficial transcript.  Add a CV or Resume if you like.

If you are hoping to get involved with this research without being a graduate student (e.g. intern, visiting scientist, undergrad researcher), please begin by checking the strict deadlines for application. If you can meet those deadlines, then please send me an email with all of the above information, plus:

4. A clear description of how you plan on funding your research experience (will you be a volunteer, or will some fellowship provide for your living expenses).  

5. TOEFL scores (international students only)

If it seems to be that we could get some great work done together, I will respond to schedule a meeting time when we can chat.  Please note that it can take me several weeks to respond.  If you do not hear from me, this indicates that there are no projects requiring your skill set at that time, but I will keep your name and interests on file.